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Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior PhD

We are happy to announce that our new PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior program is accepting applications for Fall 2017.  Please look through the materials below on how to apply, what to include in your application, and program details are posted below.

About the program

The EEB PhD is a new graduate program that uses a modern, evidence-based approach for training graduate students. The goal of the EEB PhD program is to provide students with an intellectual
foundation in ecology, evolution and behavior; experience that transcends disciplinary boundaries; and the skills to work with collaborative partnerships that cut across disciplinary, organizational, and geographical boundaries. Students participating in our program will receive training to become scientists who use theory from biological, physical, and social sciences to solve basic and applied problems.  We offer unique opportunities to develop cross-discipline advisory committees with faculty in the departments of Biological Sciences, Anthropology, Geosciences, and Human Environment Systems as well as with the Peregrine Fund and the US Geological Survey’s Snake River Field Station. Our proximity to important and unique natural areas, and our existing partnerships with state, federal, and international agencies and organizations will foster projects and collaborations that are relevant at the local, regional, national, and international levels.

How to Apply

The EEB PhD Program processes online applications through Hobson’s ApplyYourself. Please read the application instructions carefully. The Hobson’s ApplyYourself Program is available year-round for receiving application materials.  Applicants are encouraged to submit their online application well in advance of the deadline to ensure that the application is complete by the January 20 deadline.

The following items are required for your EEB application.

  1. GRE scores – please request that official scores for the GRE general test are sent to Boise State. The subject GRE is not required.
  2. Transcripts – please request official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts be sent to Boise State.
  3. Curriculum vitae (CV) – please provide a CV that outlines your education, skills, and professional experience.
  4. Letters of recommendation – Three letters of recommendation are required. Applicants should notify their recommenders using the “Recommendation Provider List” button in ApplyYourself.
  5. Cover letter – see instructions below.
  6. Identify interest in graduate faculty advisor / research labs – Please identify 1-3 labs where you are interested conducting research by listing the potential faculty advisor(s) on your application.  A list of EEB advisors is available on the program website.  Note that all faculty will review all applications, so you may be contacted by faculty you do not list, but who see you as a good candidate for their lab.
  7. Pay the application fee.  Application fees cannot be waived, but only need to be paid once per applicant.
  8. TOEFL or IELTS scores – required for international applicants only.

Please write a cover letter of no more than 750 total words that includes:

  • A description of your overall academic interests and goals. Why do you seek graduate training? What are your career goals? Why are you applying to this program?
  • A description of your specific scientific interests. This is a great place to describe your motivation to further your training in science and research in your chosen field. Also, describe why your selected research labs are a good fit with your interests.
  • A summary of your previous research experience or jobs involving laboratory or field work that cannot be seen from your CV.
  • Please describe a situation where problem solving and creativity helped you overcome a challenge or obstacle.
  • If needed, please request to be considered for a graduate assistantship in your cover letter.

For questions or additional information, please contact: EEBprogram@boisestate.edu


EEB Curriculum


Doctor of Philosophy in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior

Course Number and TitleCredits
EEB 601 Principles and Processes in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior I

EEB 602 Principles and Processes in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior II

EEB 603 Science and Communication I

EEB 604 Science and Communication II
4

4

3

3
EEB 605 Current Research in EEB (2 cr)4
Quantitative Requirement (choose at least 1 course from the following):

ANTH 504 Statistical Methods in Anthropology (3 cr)

BIOL 601 Biometry (4 cr)

BIOL 603 Advanced Biometry (4 cr)

EEB 607 Quantitative Methods for Population and Habitat Analysis (3 cr)

EEB 621 Advanced Ecological Data Analysis (3 cr)

GEOPH 522 Data Analysis and Geostatistics (3 cr)

GEOS 505 Introduction to Numerical Methods for the Geosciences (3 cr)

MATH 572 Computational Statistics (3 cr)

MATH 573 Time Series Analysis (3 cr)

MATH 574 Linear Models (3 cr)
3-4
Approved electives courses in ANTH, BIOL, BMOL, BOT, EEB, GEOS, ZOOL or related fields as approved by the supervisory committee and by the coordinator of the EEB doctoral program.13-14
EEB 691 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination1
EEB 693 Dissertation30
Total66

Doctor of Philosophy in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior

Emphasis in Global Change Biology

Course Number and TitleCredits
EEB 601 Principles and Processes in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior I

EEB 602 Principles and Processes in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior II

EEB 603 Science and Communication I

EEB 604 Science and Communication II
4

4

3

3
EEB 605 Current Research in EEB (2 cr)4
Quantitative Requirement (choose at least 1 course from the following):

ANTH 504 Statistical Methods in Anthropology (3 cr)

BIOL 601 Biometry (4 cr)

BIOL 603 Advanced Biometry (4 cr)

EEB 607 Quantitative Methods for Population and Habitat Analysis (3 cr)

EEB 621 Advanced Ecological Data Analysis (3 cr)

GEOPH 522 Data Analysis and Geostatistics (3 cr)

GEOS 505 Introduction to Numerical Methods for the Geosciences (3 cr)

MATH 572 Computational Statistics (3 cr)

MATH 573 Time Series Analysis (3 cr)

MATH 574 Linear Models (3 cr)
3-4
Human Behavior and Ecology (choose 1-2 courses from the following):

ANTH 501 Adaptation And Human Behavior (3 cr)

ANTH 502 Human Evolutionary History and Development (3 cr)

ANTH 521 Human Paleoecology of North America (3 cr)

ANTH 530 Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Anthropology (3 cr)

ANTH 531 Economic Anthropology (3 cr)

ANTH 532 Game Theory and Human Cooperation (3 cr)

CRP 502 Economic Applications to Community and Regional Planning (3 cr)

CRP 551 Sustainable Development (3 cr)
3-6
Earth Sciences (choose 1-2 courses from the following):

BIOL 628 Geographic Information Systems in Biology (3 cr)

GEOG 570 (GEOS 570) Earth System Science and Global Warming (3 cr)

GEOS 511 Hydrology: Land-Atmosphere Interaction (3 cr)

GEOS 580 Selected Topics in Watershed Hydrology (1-3 cr)

GEOS 585 Selected Topics in Isotope Geoscience (1-3 cr)

GEOS 605 Topics in Geomorphology (3 cr)

GEOS 607 Paleoclimatology and Paleoceanography (3 cr)

GEOS 620 Coupled Land-Atmosphere Modeling (3 cr)

GEOS 621 Global Hydrologic Change (3 cr)

GEOS 633 (CE 633) Contaminant Hydrogeology (3 cr)

GEOS 636 Stable Isotope Geochemistry (3 cr)

GEOS 638 Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry and Geochronology (3 cr)
3-6
Approved elective courses in ANTH, BIOL, BMOL, BOT, EEB, GEOS, ZOOL or related fields as approved by the supervisory committee and by the coordinator of the EEB doctoral program.4-5
EEB 691 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination1
EEB 693 Dissertation30
Total66


Participating Faculty

Participating Faculty Members
NameBrief Research Description
Department of Biological Sciences
Jesse BarberSensory ecology, animal behavior, conservation biology
Marc BechardRaptor biology and ecology; habitat use in raptors
Jim BelthoffBehavioral ecology, animal behavior, and avian biology
Sven BuerkiGenomics, evolutionary plant biology, bioinformatics
Trevor CaughlinSeed dispersal, ecological restoration and landowner decision-making
Marie-Anne de GraaffPlant/Soil interactions in terrestrial ecosystems
Kevin FerisMicrobial community ecology; bioremediation studies
Jennifer ForbeyPhysiological, chemical and pharmacological ecology
Eric HaydenRNA evolution, biomedical & biotechnical molecules
Julie HeathAvian biology and conservation ecology
Peter KoetsierAquatic ecology; lotic macroinvertebrate ecology
Steve NovakPlant evolutionary biology; introduced species
Ian RobertsonInsect behavior and ecology; plant-insect interactions
Marcelo SerpePlant biochemistry and physiology
James SmithPlant molecular systematics, cladistic analyses
Merlin WhiteFungal molecular systematics, arthropod-associated fungi
Jay CarlisleAvian migration and physiological ecology
Human-Environment Systems Initiative
Jodi BrandtLand use science, remote sensing, conservation biology
Vicken HillisBehavioral and institutional change in environmental settings
Neil CarterSocio-environmental systems
Department of Anthropology
Samantha BlattOsteology, dental morphology/histology, bioarchaeology
Kathryn DempsCultural evolution, behavioral and evolutionary ecology
Christopher HillEnvironmental archaeology-geoarchaeology
Mark PlewArchaeology of Western North America
Kristin SnopkowskiHuman behavioral ecology, evolutionary demography
Pei-Lin YuEthnoarchaeology, human response to climate change
John ZikerKinship, social organization, and demography
Department of Geosciences
Shawn BennerEcohydrology, biogeochemistry
Alejandro FloresEcohydrology and modeling, remote sensing
Nancy GlennRemote sensing, image analysis, geological engineering
Matt KohnGeochemistry, petrology, and paleoecology
Jen PierceGeomorphology & Paleoclimatology
US Geological Survey
Matthew GerminoPlant-soil-climate relationships; biophysical ecology
Todd KatznerConservation biology, ornithology, mammalogy
David PilliodHerpetology, wildlife ecology, stream & fire ecology
Douglas ShinnemanFire , landscape, restoration and, plant ecology
The Peregrine Fund
David AndersonRaptor biology; ecological structure and function
Chris McClureVertebrate monitoring and ecological modeling